In bloom we grow

Sam. 20. Indiana. I don't even know what I'm doing anymore.
Moose Blood

—Carbis Bay

aworldtotravel:

We’ll talk about what’s important
like your favourite Dashboard song..
Your favourite film of last year
and where our lives went wrong
Don’t worry about the weather or how cold it is outside
I promise to make this better if you stay with me tonight

Death Grips

—You might think he loves you for your money but I know what he really loves you for it's your brand new leopard skin pillbox hat

implyingmusicisgood:

bare—bear:

I can’t stop listening to this.

(via skranime)

Saves The Day

—At Your Funeral

voicealone:

Saves The Day | At Your Funeral

(via skranime)

  • me when i first joined tumblr: haha i like your shoelaces!!! superwholockian 4 life! YES let's buy a tumblr island/university/cafe SO MUCH FUN!! DEAN IN SHORTS! supeRNATURAL GIF?!!!
  • me now: i hate this website it's so embarrassing

Biology’s cruel joke goes something like this: As a teenage body goes through puberty, its circadian rhythm essentially shifts three hours backward. Suddenly, going to bed at nine or ten o’clock at night isn’t just a drag, but close to a biological impossibility. Studies of teenagers around the globe have found that adolescent brains do not start releasing melatonin until around eleven o’clock at night and keep pumping out the hormone well past sunrise. Adults, meanwhile, have little-to-no melatonin in their bodies when they wake up. With all that melatonin surging through their bloodstream, teenagers who are forced to be awake before eight in the morning are often barely alert and want nothing more than to give in to their body’s demands and fall back asleep. Because of the shift in their circadian rhythm, asking a teenager to perform well in a classroom during the early morning is like asking him or her to fly across the country and instantly adjust to the new time zone — and then do the same thing every night, for four years.

Sleep and the teenage brain (via explore-blog)

This is why you have every right to be tired.  

(via lookrainbows)

Researchers now see sleep problems as a cause, and not a side effect, of teenage depression.” - from the artcle! 

(via scruffyshezza)

(Source: explore-blog, via dullyourwords)